The one minute summary on Algeria

This is it: one minute to the best info on Algeria. This info alone will put you ahead of 99% of foreigners visiting Algeria, garner the admiration of the locals who will instantly want to be your friends, and the envy of your fellow travelers. Read on. You’ll make friends faster that way, become a traveler instead of simply being a tourist, and also enjoy your travels a lot more.

After more than a century of rule by France, Algerians fought through much of the 1950s to achieve independence in 1962. Algeria’s primary political party, the National Liberation Front (FLN), was established in 1954 as part of the struggle for independence and has largely dominated politics since. The Government of Algeria in 1988 instituted a multi-party system in response to public unrest, but the surprising first round success of the Islamic Salvation Front (FIS) in the December 1991 balloting led the Algerian army to intervene and postpone the second round of elections to prevent what the secular elite feared would be an extremist-led government from assuming power.

Algeria smart photo

Photo by rapidtravelchai

The army began a crackdown on the FIS that spurred FIS supporters to begin attacking government targets. Fighting escalated into an insurgency, which saw intense violence from 1992-98, resulting in over 100,000 deaths – many attributed to indiscriminate massacres of villagers by extremists. The government gained the upper hand by the late-1990s, and FIS’s armed wing, the Islamic Salvation Army, disbanded in January 2000. Abdelaziz BOUTEFLIKA, with the backing of the military, won the presidency in 1999 in an election widely viewed as fraudulent.

He was reelected to a second term in 2004 and overwhelmingly won a third term in 2009, after the government amended the constitution in 2008 to remove presidential term limits. Longstanding problems continue to face BOUTEFLIKA, including large-scale unemployment, a shortage of housing, unreliable electrical and water supplies, government inefficiencies and corruption, and the continuing activities of extremist militants. The Salafist Group for Preaching and Combat (GSPC) in 2006 merged with al-Qa’ida to form al-Qa’ida in the Lands of the Islamic Maghreb, which has launched an ongoing series of kidnappings and bombings targeting the Algerian Government and Western interests.

The government in 2011 introduced some political reforms in response to the Arab Spring, including lifting the 19-year-old state of emergency restrictions and increasing women’s quotas for elected assemblies. Parliamentary elections in May 2012 and municipal and provincial elections in November 2012 saw continued dominance by the FLN, with Islamist opposition parties performing poorly. Political protest activity in the country remained low in 2013, but small, sometimes violent socioeconomic demonstrations by disparate groups continued to be a common occurrence. Parliament in 2014 is expected to revise the constitution.

That was it. I promised one minute.

For other condensed info check also my other posts on local culture (don’t make the mistakes I made), local food or local drinks. And when you call your friends to tell them you were by far the most knowledgeable at the party, do that with confidence that you’ll not get hit with a 6.99 per minute bill. You’ll also pick the local food from the tray, and order a local drink with confidence.

  1. Cultural Mistakes To Avoid in  Algeria
  2. Does my current phone work in  Algeria ? Tips to cell phone usage in  Algeria
  3. Local food you should try in  Algeria and No miss drinks in  Algeria

Now, cheers to the most Algeria aware person at the cocktail party.

What are the key history moments for Algeria?

The one minute summary for Algeria geography

Algeria (Arabic: ???????) ,, is a country in North Africa. It has a Merranean Sea coastline in the north. It is surrounded by Morocco to the northwest, Tunisia to the northeast, Libya to the east, Niger to the southeast, Mali to the southwest, Mauritania and Western Sahara to the west. After the secession of South Sudan from Sudan, Algeria became the largest country in Africa. Recent Algerian history has been marred by civil wars. That said, the country is gradually restoring order and will prove an interesting — if difficult — destination.

Best places to see in Algeria

Similar to that of Libya, Algerian tourism is best known for its ancient ruins—principally those from the Phoenician, Roman, and Byzantine eras. Some of the most famous include Timgad near Batna, Hippo Regius at Annaba, Djemila at Sétif, Calama at Guelma, and ruins from all three empires at Tipasa. While better known for the Roman ruins, Algeria’s greatest tourist possibilities lie in the Sahara; there simply is no other country on earth that can offer the sort of exciting and exotic adventures around the great desert. The crown jewel is the center of Mozabite culture in the M’zab Valley.

Algeria smart photo

Photo by rapidtravelchai

The five interconnected cities are a breathaking architectural playground evocative of modern cubist and surrealist art. They simply must be seen in person. But the landscapes are impressive as well: the harsh, rugged Saharan Atlas mountains, the endless desert and Hoggar Mountains around the country’s desert capital of Tamanrasset, the huge dunefield of Grand Erg Oriental at El-Oued, and the ancient rock carvings of Djelfa and the Saharan National Park of Tassili N’Ajjer. The Merranean beaches in Algeria are woefully underdeveloped, despite excellent potential, owing to the country’s poor security situation scaring off almost all tourists. But if you are in the country for a while, a bit of relaxation will at some point be in order, and there is no need to fly over to Tunisia.

Oran (urban) on the Turquoise Coast, Annaba, and particularly Skikda and Ghazaouet all have nice beaches. The spot to go near Algiers is undoubtedly the resort town of Sidi Fredj. Of Algeria’s major cities, you may be surprised at the number of things to see. Algiers is a big, beautiful, thriving Merranean city with great architecture, ranging from French colonial superbe buildings (like the “Grande Poste”, a mix of French and Arab architecture) to the ancient area of the Casbah. Oran is a wonderful and dynamic city in the West of Algeria with a lively feeling, very good seafood restaurants, beaches, museums, nightclubs, mosques, churches, castles… Annaba, Skikda, Mostaganem, Cherchell, Tipaza and Bejaia are other beautifuls coastal cities where great architecture meets the magic blue of the sea.

Constantine is an incredible city with awesome buildings built on huge cliffs, the whole city is crossed by bridges, overlooking the Rhummel river and the countryside. Tlemcen is a jewel in the Western part of Algeria, next to the Moroccan border. It is a former capital of the Maghreb region and enjoys numerous amazing Moorish buildings such as mosques but Tlemcen is also a city of art with handicraft, Arabo-Andalu music and traditions. The “Lalla Setti” plateau overlooks the city and can be reached by a brand new cable car, there can be found parks, restaurants, woods, fountains, a splendid hotel and an incredible view on the city and its surroundings.