We all know that we don’t pat the back of a colleague in Korea to thank them for a “job well done”. Or eat with your left hand in India, or sip vodka in Russia. In many countries, these actions are harmless. But in others, they can give a wrong impression or cause offense.

In fact, whatever culture you’re from, it’s likely that you routinely do something that could cause offense somewhere else in the world. So here is:

A primer on how to avoid mistakes in Cambodia

Cambodia Culture photo

Photo by missmei

Cambodia is a country at a crossroads. While the more heavily touristed places like Phnom Penh and Siem Reap are well adjusted to tourist behaviour, people in places such as Stung Treng or Banlung are less so. Always ask permission before you take somebody’s picture, as many in the more remote areas do not like to be photographed, and some in the urban areas will ask for payment. Dress for women is more conservative in Cambodia. While shorts are now acceptable in Phnom Penh and Siem Reap, it is more respectful to wear knee length shorts or trousers when outside of these areas.

Groups of young children can be found everywhere in Cambodia and many travellers feel ‘pestered’ by them to purchase their friendship bracelets and other wares. However, it’s often the case that children enjoy the chance to practice their English on you- and by asking them their names and ages a conversation is likely to develop where the ‘hard sell’ is forgotten. Children and adults alike enjoy looking at photographs of your family and home country. The Khmer Rouge issue is a very delicate one, and one which Cambodians generally prefer not to talk about. However, if you approach it with politeness, they’ll gladly respond.

People, in general, hold no qualms when talking about the Vietnamese; in fact, they have been widely perceived as liberators when they intervened in Cambodia in 1979 to overthrow the aforementioned brutal regime. The pro-Vietnamese regime gradually rebuilt all the infrastructure that was severely damaged by the Khmer Rouge’s policy of de-urbanising the country leading to economic prosperity in the 1980s, with sporadic uprisings.With this, you had the primer on key facts about Cambodia, and key facts on culture and customs. Another important part of the culture is the local food and the local drinks. Make sure you read our posts on Cambodia food and drinks:

Local food you should try in Cambodia and No miss drinks in Cambodia.

Other tips that you’d like to share on mistakes to avoid in Cambodia? Please comment below.