We all know that we don’t pat the back of a colleague in Korea to thank them for a “job well done”. Or eat with your left hand in India, or sip vodka in Russia. In many countries, these actions are harmless. But in others, they can give a wrong impression or cause offense.

In fact, whatever culture you’re from, it’s likely that you routinely do something that could cause offense somewhere else in the world. So here is:

A primer on how to avoid mistakes in

Though the survey form given on arrival (and collected at departure) is optional, the airport staff will be very disappointed if you don’t complete it. In case you’ve misplaced it, additional ones are available at the airport at departure.

The Cook Islands inhabitants are not behind the times. They have TV and Internet and they know very well what’s going on in the world, so don’t patronize them. German tourists on outer islands might be asked about Germany’s “dark history”, but they know very well that these times have gone a long time ago, and that modern Germany is an industrialized and democratic country. Respect their religious habits; especially that nearly everything is closed on Sundays (with the exception of a few bars and shops).

Contrary to popular belief, the Cook Islands own history doesn’t include head hunting but there was a large loss of life during the World War I (1914-1918) fighting with the British against Germany and Central Powers.

With this, you had the primer on key facts about Cook Islands, and key facts on culture and customs. Another important part of the culture is the local food and the local drinks. Make sure you read our posts on Cook Islands food and drinks:

Local food you should try in Cook Islands and No miss drinks in Cook Islands.

Other tips that you’d like to share on mistakes to avoid in Cook Islands? Please comment below.