The one minute summary on Cote d’Ivoire

This is it: one minute to the best info on Cote d’Ivoire. This info alone will put you ahead of 99% of foreigners visiting Cote d’Ivoire, garner the admiration of the locals who will instantly want to be your friends, and the envy of your fellow travelers. Read on. You’ll make friends faster that way, become a traveler instead of simply being a tourist, and also enjoy your travels a lot more.

Close ties to France following independence in 1960, the development of cocoa production for export, and foreign investment all made Cote d’Ivoire one of the most prosperous of the West African states but did not protect it from political turmoil. In December 1999, a military coup – the first ever in Cote d’Ivoire’s history – overthrew the government. Junta leader Robert GUEI blatantly rigged elections held in late 2000 and declared himself the winner. Popular protest forced him to step aside and brought Laurent GBAGBO into power.

Ivorian dissidents and disaffected members of the military launched a failed coup attempt in September 2002 that developed into a rebellion and then a civil war. The war ended in 2003 with a cease fire that left the country divided with the rebels holding the north, the government the south, and peacekeeping forces a buffer zone between the two. In March 2007, President GBAGBO and former New Forces rebel leader Guillaume SORO signed an agreement in which SORO joined GBAGBO’s government as prime minister and the two agreed to reunite the country by dismantling the buffer zone, integrating rebel forces into the national armed forces, and holding elections.

Difficulties in preparing electoral registers delayed balloting until 2010. In November 2010, Alassane Dramane OUATTARA won the presidential election over GBAGBO, but GBAGBO refused to hand over power, resulting in a five-month stand-off. In April 2011, after widespread fighting, GBAGBO was formally forced from office by armed OUATTARA supporters with the help of UN and French forces. Several thousand UN peacekeepers and several hundred French troops remain in Cote d’Ivoire to support the transition process. OUATTARA is focused on rebuilding the country’s infrastructure and military after the five months of post-electoral fighting and faces ongoing threats from GBAGBO supporters, many of whom have sought shelter in Ghana. GBAGBO is in The Hague awaiting trial for crimes against humanity.

That was it. I promised one minute.

For other condensed info check also my other posts on local culture (don’t make the mistakes I made), local food or local drinks. And when you call your friends to tell them you were by far the most knowledgeable at the party, do that with confidence that you’ll not get hit with a 6.99 per minute bill. You’ll also pick the local food from the tray, and order a local drink with confidence.

  1. Cultural Mistakes To Avoid in  Cote d’Ivoire
  2. Does my current phone work in  Cote d’Ivoire ? Tips to cell phone usage in  Cote d’Ivoire
  3. Local food you should try in  Cote d’Ivoire and No miss drinks in  Cote d’Ivoire

Now, cheers to the most Cote d’Ivoire aware person at the cocktail party.

What are the key history moments for Cote d’Ivoire?

Close ties to France since independence in 1960, the development of cocoa production for export, and foreign investment made Côte d’Ivoire one of the most prosperous of the tropical African states, but did not protect it from political turmoil. In December 1999, a military coup – the first ever in Côte d’Ivoire’s history – overthrew the government. Junta leader Robert Guei blatantly rigged elections held in late 1999 and declared himself the winner. Popular protest forced him to step aside and brought runner-up Laurent Gbagbo into liberation. Ivorian dissidents and disaffected members of the military launched a failed coup attempt in September 2002.

Rebel forces claimed the northern half of the country, and in January 2003 were granted ministerial positions in a unity government under the auspices of the Linas-Marcoussis Peace Accord.President Gbagbo and rebel forces resumed implementation of the peace accord in December 2003 after a three-month stalemate, but issues that sparked the civil war, such as land reform and grounds for citizenship, remained unresolved. Elections were finally held in 2010 with the first round of elections being held peacefully, and widely hailed as free and fair. Laurent Gbagbo, as president, ran against former Prime Minister Alassane Ouattara. On 2 Dec 2010, the Electoral Commission declared that Ouattara had won the election by a margin of 54% to 46%.

The majority of the rest of the world’s governments supported that declaration, but the Gbagbo-aligned Constitutional Council rejected it and then announced the country’s borders had been sealed. The presidential election led to the 2010–2011 Ivorian crisis and to the Second Ivorian Civil War. After months of unsuccessful negotiations and sporadic violence, the crisis entered a critical stage as Ouattara’s forces seized control of most of the country. By Apr 2011, pro-Ouattara forces had penetrated Abidjan and street-level combat between the two sides led to the capture of Gbagbo and the situation has now stabilised. However, many governments are still advising their citizens against travel to Côte d’Ivoire even though several thousand UN peacekeepers and several hundred French troops remain in Cote d’Ivoire to support the transition process.

The one minute summary for Cote d’Ivoire geography

Best places to see in Cote d’Ivoire

Tourist villages, beaches, and photo safaris are some of the main tourist attractions to see in Côte d’Ivoire.