The one minute summary on

Egypt photo

Photo by dorena-wm

This is it: one minute to the best info on Egypt. This info alone will put you ahead of 99% of foreigners visiting Egypt, garner the admiration of the locals who will instantly want to be your friends, and the envy of your fellow travelers. Read on. You’ll make friends faster that way, become a traveler instead of simply being a tourist, and also enjoy your travels a lot more.

The regularity and richness of the annual Nile River flood, coupled with semi-isolation provided by deserts to the east and west, allowed for the development of one of the world’s great civilizations. A unified kingdom arose circa 3200 B.C., and a series of dynasties ruled in Egypt for the next three millennia.

The last native dynasty fell to the Persians in 341 B.C., who in turn were replaced by the Greeks, Romans, and Byzantines. It was the Arabs who introduced Islam and the Arabic language in the 7th century and who ruled for the next six centuries. A local military caste, the Mamluks took control about 1250 and continued to govern after the conquest of Egypt by the Ottoman Turks in 1517. Completion of the Suez Canal in 1869 elevated Egypt as an important world transportation hub. Ostensibly to protect its investments, Britain seized control of Egypt’s government in 1882, but nominal allegiance to the Ottoman Empire continued until 1914. Partially independent from the UK in 1922, Egypt acquired full sovereignty from Britain in 1952.

The completion of the Aswan High Dam in 1971 and the resultant Lake Nasser have altered the time-honored place of the Nile River in the agriculture and ecology of Egypt. A rapidly growing population (the largest in the Arab world), limited arable land, and dependence on the Nile all continue to overtax resources and stress society.

The government has struggled to meet the demands of Egypt’s population through economic reform and massive investment in communications and physical infrastructure. Inspired by the 2010 Tunisian revolution, Egyptian opposition groups led demonstrations and labor strikes countrywide, culminating in President Hosni MUBARAK’s ouster. Egypt’s military assumed national leadership until a new parliament was in place in early 2012; later that same year, Mohammed MORSI won the presidential election.

Following often violent protests throughout the spring of 2013 against MORSI’s government and the Muslim Brotherhood (MB), and massive anti-government demonstrations, the Egyptian Armed Forces (EAF) intervened and removed MORSI from power in mid-July 2013 and replaced him with interim president Adly MANSOUR. In mid-January 2014, voters approved a new constitution by referendum. Presidential elections to replace MANSOUR are scheduled for late May 2014. According to the constitution and the government’s transitional road map, preparations for parliamentary elections will begin by mid-July 2014.

That was it. I promised one minute.

For other condensed info check also my other posts on local culture (don’t make the mistakes I made), local food or local drinks. And when you call your friends to tell them you were by far the most knowledgeable at the party, do that with confidence that you’ll not get hit with a 6.99 per minute bill. You’ll also pick the local food from the tray, and order a local drink with confidence.

  1. Cultural Mistakes To Avoid in  Egypt
  2. Does my current phone work in  Egypt ? Tips to cell phone usage in  Egypt
  3. Local food you should try in  Egypt and No miss drinks in  Egypt

Now, cheers to the most Egypt aware person at the cocktail party.

What are the key history moments for Egypt?

The regularity and richness of the annual Nile River flood, coupled with semi-isolation provided by deserts to the east and west, allowed for the development of one of the world’s great civilizations. A unified kingdom arose around 3200 B.C. and a series of dynasties ruled in Egypt for the next three millennia. The last native dynasty fell to the Persians in 341 B.C., who in turn were replaced by the Greeks, Romans, and Byzantines. It was the Arabs who introduced Islam and the Arabic language in the 7th century and who ruled for the next six centuries.

A local military caste, the Mamluks, took control about 1250 and continued to govern after the conquest of Egypt by the Ottoman Turks in 1517. Following the completion of the Suez Canal in 1869, Egypt became an important world transportation hub, but also fell heavily into debt. Ostensibly to protect its investments, Britain seized control of Egypt’s government in 1882, but nominal allegiance to the Ottoman Empire continued until 1914. Partially independent from the UK in 1922, Egypt acquired full sovereignty following World War II.

The completion of the Aswan High Dam in 1971 and the resultant Lake Nasser have altered the time-honoured place of the Nile River in agriculture and the ecology of Egypt. A rapidly growing population (the largest in the Arab world), limited arable land, and dependence on the Nile all continue to overtax resources and stress society. The government has struggled to prepare the economy for the new millennium through economic reform and massive investment in communications and physical infrastructure.

The one minute summary for Egypt geography

Best places to see in Egypt

Highlights of any visit to Egypt include famous archaeological sites from both Lower (North) and Upper (South) Egypt. The most famous are: Cairo: the Pyramids of Giza and the Sphinx the Egyptian Museum the pyramids and temples of Saqqara and Dahshur Citadel of Salah El Din Mosque of Mohamed Ali Alexandria: Alexandria, with several historical sights and the stunning new Bibliotheca Alexandrina, is the country’s main summer attraction for Egyptians escaping the summer heat and looking for a place to spend the summer vacation.

Tourist attractions include Roman and Greek monuments, Bibliotheca Alexandria, Qa’edbay’s Castle, and Qasr El Montaza (El Montaza Palace). Ain Sokhna A line of mountains and calm beautiful beaches for miles and a range of hotels to satisfy various budgets 90 min drive from Cairo for a relaxing experience with a group of friends or couples to stay there is a must. Port Said: Port Said, is one of the country’s main summer resorts for Egyptians escaping the summer heat and looking for a place to spend the summer vacation and to have shopping benefiting its free trade zone, Tourist attractions include the unique buildings of the city which back to the 19th century an the old lighthouse of Port Said which was the first building built in the world using reinforced concrete.

Luxor: the temples of Luxor and the West Bank across the Nile the Valley of the Kings the Temples of Abu Simbel Aswan: In Aswan, you can see even more temples and ancient monuments. You can also see Geziret El Nabatat (The Island of Plants). This is an island in the Nile River of Aswan which was planted by rare species of plants, trees, and flowers. Perhaps the most popular activity in Luxor and Aswan is to do the Nile Cruise on a ship from Aswan to Luxor.

It enables you to stop at each location along the Nile where you can see all the famous ancient monuments as well as experience being in the Nile River inside a five-star hotel boat. The Red Sea resorts at Sinai peninsula, including Dahab, Hurghada, and Sharm El Sheikh. The Red Sea offers some of the best dive locations in the world. Sharm El Sheikh: In Sharm El Sheikh, you can make different types of excursions as diving, snorkeling and safari. You can also go from Sharm El Sheikh to visit Ras Mohammed, Cairo, Luxor and St. Catherine Monastery. The sights of the Sinai peninsula, including Saint Catherine’s Monastery and Mount Sinai. The western desert and the oases there, including Siwa, Memphis, with some relics of ancient Egypt – including a huge statue of Ramesses II, evoking the image which inspired Percy Bysshe Shelley’s poem Ozymandias