The one minute summary on Ireland

This is it: one minute to the best info on Ireland. This info alone will put you ahead of 99% of foreigners visiting Ireland, garner the admiration of the locals who will instantly want to be your friends, and the envy of your fellow travelers. Read on. You’ll make friends faster that way, become a traveler instead of simply being a tourist, and also enjoy your travels a lot more.

Celtic tribes arrived on the island between 600 and 150 B.C. Invasions by Norsemen that began in the late 8th century were finally ended when King Brian BORU defeated the Danes in 1014. Norman invasions began in the 12th century and set off more than seven centuries of Anglo-Irish struggle marked by fierce rebellions and harsh repressions. The Irish famine of the mid-19th century saw the population of the island drop by one third through starvation and emigration. For more than a century after that the population of the island continued to fall only to begin growing again in the 1960s.

Ireland smart photo

Photo by infomatique

Over the last 50 years, Ireland’s high birthrate has made it demographically one of the youngest populations in the EU. The modern Irish state traces its origins to the failed 1916 Easter Monday Uprising which touched off several years of guerrilla warfare resulting in independence from the UK in 1921 for 26 southern counties; six northern counties remained part of the UK. Unresolved issues in Northern Ireland erupted into years of violence known as the “Troubles” that began in the 1960s.

The Government of Ireland was part of a process along with the UK and US Governments that helped broker what is known as The Good Friday Agreement in Northern Ireland in 1998. This initiated a new phase of cooperation between Irish and British governments. Ireland was neutral in World War II and continues its policy of military neutrality. Ireland joined the European Community in 1973 and the Eurozone currency union in 1999. The economic boom years of the Celtic Tiger (1995-2007) saw rapid economic growth, which came to an abrupt end in 2008 with the meltdown of the Irish banking system. Today the economy is recovering, fueled by large and growing foreign direct investment, especially from US multi-nationals.

That was it. I promised one minute.

For other condensed info check also my other posts on local culture (don’t make the mistakes I made), local food or local drinks. And when you call your friends to tell them you were by far the most knowledgeable at the party, do that with confidence that you’ll not get hit with a 6.99 per minute bill. You’ll also pick the local food from the tray, and order a local drink with confidence.

  1. Cultural Mistakes To Avoid in  Ireland
  2. Does my current phone work in  Ireland ? Tips to cell phone usage in  Ireland
  3. Local food you should try in  Ireland and No miss drinks in  Ireland

Now, cheers to the most Ireland aware person at the cocktail party.

What are the key history moments for Ireland?

The one minute summary for Ireland geography

Best places to see in Ireland

Blarney Castle – Located in County Cork This historic castle is known for its “Blarney Stone.” Tradition is that if the Blarney Stone is kissed, one will be blessed with great eloquence, better known as “the gift of the gab.” One kisses the stone by lying back and being held by an employee of the castle. Photographers are there to capture the moment! Cliffs of Moher – Located in County Clare One of Ireland’s biggest and most visited tourist attractions. The Cliffs are 230 meters in height and tower over the Atlantic Ocean. This attraction, whilst beautiful in the Summer, can be a bit of a tourist trap.

If you intend to take your own transport, the over-priced car park is your only option (since the road is too narrow to park on) and to purchase your ‘pay-and-display’ parking ticket, you will need to go all the way through the gift shop (on the opposite side of the road), before returning to place it in your car. Kilkenny – One of Ireland’s favourite tourist spots, this Medieval Capital just 1 hour 40 minutes train out of Dublin City is a must see. Its beautiful buildings and of course imposing Norman Castle – not to mention the numerous festivals including the Arts Festival and Rhythm and Roots Festival – make Kilkenny a most desirable location. Co. Donegal – An amazing area to see if you have your own transport, as bus services can be fairly limited. This part of the country is very traditional and you can expect to see plenty of low stone walls, thatched roof houses, rugged hills, cliffs and golden sand beaches. Best visited during Spring or Summer, there are plenty of hills walks and photo opportunities waiting to be discovered.