The one minute summary on

This is it: one minute to the best info on Kosovo. This info alone will put you ahead of 99% of foreigners visiting Kosovo, garner the admiration of the locals who will instantly want to be your friends, and the envy of your fellow travelers. Read on. You’ll make friends faster that way, become a traveler instead of simply being a tourist, and also enjoy your travels a lot more.

The central Balkans were part of the Roman and Byzantine Empires before ethnic Serbs migrated to the territories of modern Kosovo in the 7th century. During the medieval period, Kosovo became the center of a Serbian Empire and saw the construction of many important Serb religious sites, including many architecturally significant Serbian Orthodox monasteries.

The defeat of Serbian forces at the Battle of Kosovo in 1389 led to five centuries of Ottoman rule during which large numbers of Turks and Albanians moved to Kosovo. By the end of the 19th century, Albanians replaced the Serbs as the dominant ethnic group in Kosovo. Serbia reacquired control over Kosovo from the Ottoman Empire during the First Balkan War of 1912. After World War II, Kosovo became an autonomous province of Serbia in the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia (S.F.R.Y.) with status almost equivalent to that of a republic under the 1974 S.F.R.Y. constitution.

Despite legislative concessions, Albanian nationalism increased in the 1980s, which led to riots and calls for Kosovo’s independence. At the same time, Serb nationalist leaders, such as Slobodan MILOSEVIC, exploited Kosovo Serb claims of maltreatment to secure votes from supporters, many of whom viewed Kosovo as their cultural heartland. Under MILOSEVIC’s leadership, Serbia instituted a new constitution in 1989 that revoked Kosovo’s status as an autonomous province of Serbia. Kosovo’s Albanian leaders responded in 1991 by organizing a referendum that declared Kosovo independent.

Under MILOSEVIC, Serbia carried out repressive measures against the Kosovar Albanians in the early 1990s as the unofficial Kosovo government, led by Ibrahim RUGOVA, used passive resistance in an attempt to try to gain international assistance and recognition of an independent Kosovo. Albanians dissatisfied with RUGOVA’s passive strategy in the 1990s created the Kosovo Liberation Army and launched an insurgency. Starting in 1998, Serbian military, police, and paramilitary forces under MILOSEVIC conducted a brutal counterinsurgency campaign that resulted in massacres and massive expulsions of ethnic Albanians.

Approximately 800,000 ethnic Albanians were forced from their homes in Kosovo during this time. International attempts to mediate the conflict failed, and MILOSEVIC’s rejection of a proposed settlement led to a three-month NATO military operation against Serbia beginning in March 1999 that forced Serbia to agree to withdraw its military and police forces from Kosovo. UN Security Council Resolution 1244 (1999) placed Kosovo under a transitional administration, the UN Interim Administration Mission in Kosovo (UNMIK), pending a determination of Kosovo’s future status.

Kosovo photo

Photo by FriaLOve

A UN-led process began in late 2005 to determine Kosovo’s final status. The negotiations ran in stages between 2006 and 2007, but ended without agreement between Belgrade and Pristina. On 17 February 2008, the Kosovo Assembly declared Kosovo independent. Since then, over 100 countries have recognized Kosovo, and it has joined the International Monetary Fund, World Bank, European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, the Council of Europe Development Bank, and signed a framework agreement with the European Investment Bank (EIB). In October 2008, Serbia sought an advisory opinion from the International Court of Justice (ICJ) on the legality under international law of Kosovo’s declaration of independence.

The ICJ released the advisory opinion in July 2010 affirming that Kosovo’s declaration of independence did not violate general principles of international law, UN Security Council Resolution 1244, or the Constitutive Framework. The opinion was closely tailored to Kosovo’s unique history and circumstances. Serbia continues to reject Kosovo’s independence, but the two countries reached an agreement to normalize their relations in April 2013 through EU-facilitated talks and are currently engaged in the implementation process.

That was it. I promised one minute.

For other condensed info check also my other posts on local culture (don’t make the mistakes I made), local food or local drinks. And when you call your friends to tell them you were by far the most knowledgeable at the party, do that with confidence that you’ll not get hit with a 6.99 per minute bill. You’ll also pick the local food from the tray, and order a local drink with confidence.

  1. Cultural Mistakes To Avoid in  Kosovo
  2. Does my current phone work in  Kosovo ? Tips to cell phone usage in  Kosovo
  3. Local food you should try in  Kosovo and No miss drinks in  Kosovo

Now, cheers to the most Kosovo aware person at the cocktail party.

What are the key history moments for Kosovo?

The one minute summary for Kosovo geography

Best places to see in Kosovo

Prishtina is the capital city of Kosovo. Places that should be visited in Prishtina is the quarter near the National Museum of Kosova. In addition to visiting the museum where a lot of archaeological artifacts are presented, in both ways when you exit, you see the old mosques, since the Ottoman Empire. Prizren. The most historical city in Kosovo, capital of the Serbian empire in the XIV century. It has plenty of beautiful examples of Serbian and Ottoman medieval architecture. UNESCO World Heritage Site – Serbian Orthodox church of Our Lady of Ljeviš (XIV century) is located in the city. UNESCO World Heritage Site – Patriachate of Pe? lies 2 km to the west of the Peja city center. It is the mother church of the Serbian Orthodoxy, and it was established in the XII century. It is a beautiful monastery with many spectacular frescoes.

UNESCO World Heritage Site – Visoki De?ani Monastery is one of the most important monasteries of the Serbian Orthodox Church. It is famous for its elegant and peculiar architecture. As an orthodox monastery from the XIII century, it successfuly mixes western and eastern church building elements to form a particular hybrid style only known on the territory of old Serbia. This monastery is particularly noted for some of the world’s finest medieval frescoes adorning its walls. It is located near Peja. UNESCO World Heritage Site – Gra?anica Monastery is one of the most beautiful examples of Serbian medieval ecclesiastical architecture.

Kosovo photo

Photo by Rob Hogeslag

This monastery was built by the Serbian king Milutin in the Serbo-Byzantine style. It is noted for its frescoes, and being the only medieval Serbian monastery found in an urban setting complete with an old school and archives. It is located near Prishtina. Serbian Orthodox Monastery of the Assumption of Holy Virgin Mary, Gra?anica. UNESCO World Heritage Site. Velika Ho?a, a beautiful village with 13 medieval churches and a centuries-old tradition of wine-making. Waterfall Of The Drini River – Located north of Peja behind the Berdynaj village. During the summer, this place is fantastic, and the road to the river is an amazing, narrow road with wires on one side and the river on the other; this is a great part of Kosovo. The Rugova Gorge.

The Rugova gorge is also to the north west of Peja and can be found by following the same road that leads to the Pe? Patriarchy, and driving further. The canyon has extremely steep walls reaching possibly up to 300 metres. The Gjakova Old Bazaar. A very beautiful old “shopping centre” from 17th century. It was burned down during the war in 1999 and reconstructed recently. In the centre of the bazaar is an old mosque that was built in the 15th century. The Mitrovica Bridge. An interesting symbol of the division of the population in Kosovo. This bridge is the dividing line between Serbs and Albanians in Mitrovice/Mitrovica.

It will almost always be safe to approach the bridge and look at it, although the French soldiers who guard it may not let you cross if the political situation is worse than average (average not being so good). The Roma quarter (mahalla) in Gjilan. Gjilan is located to the South East of Pristina. Brezovica Ski Centre – Old infrastructure but great slopes, located in Southern Kosova. Novo Brdo (in Latin documents written as Novaberd, Novus Mons or Novamonte; and in Saxon miners’ documents as Nyeuberghe) was mentioned in the historical documents as early as 1326. Novo Brdo was a metropolis at the time, with a huge medieval fortress built on the top of an extinct volcano cone, the remains of which can be visited today, and residential sections sprawling all around.

In the outer wall of the fortress, a large cross is visible, built into the stones. The castle dates back to the Byzantine Empire. Novo Monte Fortress Ulpiana, one of the oldest cities in the Balkan peninsula, is just 20-30 minutes away from Pristina towards Gjilan. It was re-constructed by emperor Justinian I. Mirusha Waterfalls on the eponymous river.