The one minute summary on

This is it: one minute to the best info on Kuwait. This info alone will put you ahead of 99% of foreigners visiting Kuwait, garner the admiration of the locals who will instantly want to be your friends, and the envy of your fellow travelers. Read on. You’ll make friends faster that way, become a traveler instead of simply being a tourist, and also enjoy your travels a lot more.

Britain oversaw foreign relations and defense for the ruling Kuwaiti AL-SABAH dynasty from 1899 until independence in 1961. Kuwait was attacked and overrun by Iraq on 2 August 1990.

Following several weeks of aerial bombardment, a US-led, UN coalition began a ground assault on 23 February 1991 that liberated Kuwait in four days. Kuwait spent more than $5 billion to repair oil infrastructure damaged during 1990-91. The AL-SABAH family has ruled since returning to power in 1991 and reestablished an elected legislature that in recent years has become increasingly assertive. The country witnessed the historic election in 2009 of four women to its National Assembly. Amid the 2010-11 uprisings and protests across the Arab world, stateless Arabs, known as bidun, staged small protests in February and March 2011 demanding citizenship, jobs, and other benefits available to Kuwaiti nationals.

Youth activist groups – supported by opposition legislators – rallied repeatedly in 2011 for the prime minister’s dismissal amid allegations of widespread government corruption. Demonstrators forced the prime minister to resign in late 2011. In late 2012, Kuwait witnessed unprecedented protests in response to the Amir’s changes to the electoral law by decree reducing the number of votes per person from four to one. The opposition, led by a coalition of Sunni Islamists, tribalists, some liberals, and myriad youth groups, largely boycotted legislative elections in 2012 and 2013 ushering in legislatures more amenable to the government’s agenda. Since 2006, the Amir has dissolved the National Assembly on five occasions (the Constitutional Court annulled the Assembly in June 2012 and again in June 2013) and shuffled the cabinet over a dozen times, usually citing political stagnation and gridlock between the legislature and the government.

That was it. I promised one minute.

For other condensed info check also my other posts on local culture (don’t make the mistakes I made), local food or local drinks. And when you call your friends to tell them you were by far the most knowledgeable at the party, do that with confidence that you’ll not get hit with a 6.99 per minute bill. You’ll also pick the local food from the tray, and order a local drink with confidence.

  1. Cultural Mistakes To Avoid in  Kuwait
  2. Does my current phone work in  Kuwait ? Tips to cell phone usage in  Kuwait
  3. Local food you should try in  Kuwait and No miss drinks in  Kuwait

Now, cheers to the most Kuwait aware person at the cocktail party.

What are the key history moments for Kuwait?

Kuwaitis predominantly trace their origins to Saudi Arabia, Iran and Iraq, although a small minority of Kuwaitis trace their origins back to Africa and India. By 1752, the long term residents of Kuwait called for the establishment of a stable government. Kuwait soon rapidly became the principal center of commerce in the region, attracts merchants. Kuwait was established as a harbour city for merchants. Mubarak I signed an agreement with the British making Kuwait a British Protectorate in 1899.

The British were in Kuwait for quite a while by then, and as early as the 1770’s Abdullah I had a contract with the British to deliver mail for them up to Aleppo in Syria. The agreement gave the British control of the Kuwaiti foreign policy in exchange for military protection. In 1938, oil was first struck at the Burgan oil field in Kuwait, and by 1946, they started exporting it. In 1961, Kuwait nullified the treaty of 1899, and became an independent nation. Kuwait was attacked and overrun by Iraq on 2 Aug 1990. Following several weeks of aerial bombardment, a US-led UN coalition began a ground assault on 23 Feb 1991 that completely liberated Kuwait in four days; February 26 is celebrated as Liberation Day. Kuwait spent more than $5 billion to repair oil infrastructure damaged during 1990-91.

The one minute summary for Kuwait geography

Best places to see in Kuwait

See Kuwait City for listings of attractions in the city. Note there has been a lot of tank graveyard/highway of death pictures floating around the internet recently, but those pictures are from 2006 and earlier and the place is now cleaned up. It is not possible to see the tank graveyard anymore. Kuwait is not the ideal vacation spot in the region, but if on a business trip, there are some sites worth seeing Failaka Island, knetmalou@hotmail.com (take KPTC ferry from Ras Al Salmiya (Ras al Ardh) near scientific center or private speedboat near Marina Mall). A port with many old dhows, Failaka Island can be reached by regular ferry services.

There are also some Bronze Age and Greek archaeological sites well worth viewing, including the island’s Greek temple. Failaka Island was named Ikarus by the Greeks who, under Alexander the Great, established an outpost in the island. 3 KD. Al-Mubarakiya shops, middle of Kuwait City. Traditional-style Shops, Really need to visit. Mina Al Ahmadi. Mina Al Ahmadi, lying 19km (12 miles) south of Kuwait City, is an oil port with immense jetties for supertanker traffic.

The Oil Display Center pays homage to the work of the Kuwait Oil Company (Reservations needed) Kazmah desert cliffs, (go on Road 80, turn right to Road 801 to Bubiyan, take first exit and turn left). Being one of the few elevations in the Kuwaiti desert these cliffs allow a good view on the bay if the visibility is good. A lot of young Kuwaitis come here on weekends to challenge their Jeeps and Quads uphill.