We all know that we don’t pat the back of a colleague in Korea to thank them for a “job well done”. Or eat with your left hand in India, or sip vodka in Russia. In many countries, these actions are harmless. But in others, they can give a wrong impression or cause offense.

In fact, whatever culture you’re from, it’s likely that you routinely do something that could cause offense somewhere else in the world. So here is:

A primer on how to avoid mistakes in Namibia

Namibians are very proud of their country. It is a well developed country (albeit still a developing nation) with all the modern amenities and technologies. Namibians have been exposed to a surprisingly wide variety of peoples during the United Nations supervising of the elections, as well as from various volunteer organizations. They are not offended by Westerners wearing shorts, nor by women wearing pants.

It is not uncommon to see Afrikaners with thick, knee-high socks (keeps snakes from getting a good bite) and shorts walking about. It is customary when greeting someone to ask them how they’re doing. It’s a simple exchange where each person asks “How are you?” (or the local version “Howzit?”) and responds with a correspondingly short answer, and then proceed with whatever your business is about. It’s a good idea to do this at tourist info booths, in markets, when getting into taxis, even in shops in Windhoek (though it’s normally not done in some of the bigger stores in the malls)

With this, you had the primer on key facts about Namibia, and key facts on culture and customs. Another important part of the culture is the local food and the local drinks. Make sure you read our posts on Namibia food and drinks:

Local food you should try in Namibia and No miss drinks in Namibia.

Other tips that you’d like to share on mistakes to avoid in Namibia? Please comment below.