The one minute summary on Palau

This is it: one minute to the best info on Palau. This info alone will put you ahead of 99% of foreigners visiting Palau, garner the admiration of the locals who will instantly want to be your friends, and the envy of your fellow travelers. Read on. You’ll make friends faster that way, become a traveler instead of simply being a tourist, and also enjoy your travels a lot more.

Palau photo

Photo by .Robert.

After three decades as part of the UN Trust Territory of the Pacific under US administration, this westernmost cluster of the Caroline Islands opted for independence in 1978 rather than join the Federated States of Micronesia. A Compact of Free Association with the US was approved in 1986 but not ratified until 1993. It entered into force the following year when the islands gained independence.

That was it. I promised one minute.

For other condensed info check also my other posts on local culture (don’t make the mistakes I made), local food or local drinks. And when you call your friends to tell them you were by far the most knowledgeable at the party, do that with confidence that you’ll not get hit with a 6.99 per minute bill. You’ll also pick the local food from the tray, and order a local drink with confidence.

  1. Cultural Mistakes To Avoid in  Palau
  2. Does my current phone work in  Palau ? Tips to cell phone usage in  Palau
  3. Local food you should try in  Palau and No miss drinks in  Palau

Now, cheers to the most Palau aware person at the cocktail party.

What are the key history moments for Palau?

Early Palauans may have come from Polynesia and Asia. Depending on the origin of a family, Palauans may represent many parts of Melanesia, Micronesia and Polynesia. However, they are not traditionally considered to be Micronesian. For thousands of years, Palauans have had a well established matrilineal society, believed to have descended from Javanese precedents.

Palau photo

Photo by vil.sandi

Palau had limited relations before the 18th century, mainly with Yap and Java. Had it not been for shipwrecked islanders who took refuge in the Philippines, Europeans likely would not have found Palau until much later. Englishman Captain Henry Wilson was shipwrecked off the island of Ulong in 1783 and it was Wilson who gave the archipelago the name “Pelew Islands”. In the late 19th century, possession of the islands was claimed by Britain, Spain, and Germany. In 1885, the matter was brought to Pope Leo XIII for a decision. The Pope recognized the Spanish claim, but granted economic concessions to Britain and Germany.

Palau then became part of the Spanish East Indies, along with the Northern Mariana Islands, the Caroline Islands and the Marshall Islands. They were all administered from the Philippines. Spain sold the Palau archipelago to Germany in 1899 after which it was administered from German New Guinea, and a period of economic development began. German engineers began exploiting the islands’ deposits of bauxite and phosphate, and a rich harvest in copra was made. WWI intervened and the German period lasted only 15 years after which the League of Nations awarded Palau to Japan. The Japanese presence made Palau a major target for the Allied forces in World War II, and there were several major battles in the area.

The one minute summary for Palau geography

Best places to see in Palau

Palau International Coral Reef Center, ? 680.488.6950 (picrc@picrc.org), . Very educational aquarium with a good souvenir shop. Emphasis of displays is on education. They include a topographical map of Palau; a recreation of a mangrove swamp, a seagrass aquarium; an inner reef aquarium; an exhibition of coral and another of the country’s famed jellyfish; deep-water aquariums and a couple of salt-water crocodiles to end the tour.

Palau photo

Photo by mattk1979

Easy walk from downtown Koror in the direction of Malakal Etpison Museum, Main Road, Koror, Palau (on the right side of the road coming from the airport going to Koror), ? (680) 488-6730, . Monday – Saturday: 9am – 5pm. The museum is dedicated to the late Palau President Ngiratkel Etpison (1989-1993). The 3-story building houses 2 floors of Palauan and Micronesian artifacts, displays, photography and information. The top floor has restrooms, more displays, and a large gift shop selling art, jewelry, books and souvenirs. It also doubles as the French Consulate office in Palau. $10 (tourists)