The one minute summary on

Saint Kitts and Nevis photo

Photo by ClatieK

This is it: one minute to the best info on Saint Kitts and Nevis. This info alone will put you ahead of 99% of foreigners visiting Saint Kitts and Nevis, garner the admiration of the locals who will instantly want to be your friends, and the envy of your fellow travelers. Read on. You’ll make friends faster that way, become a traveler instead of simply being a tourist, and also enjoy your travels a lot more.

Carib Indians occupied the islands of the West Indies for hundreds of years before the British began settlement in 1623. In 1967, the island territory of Saint Christopher-Nevis-Anguilla became an associated state of the UK with full internal autonomy. The island of Anguilla rebelled and was allowed to secede in 1971. The remaining islands achieved independence in 1983 as Saint Kitts and Nevis. In 1998, a vote in Nevis on a referendum to separate from Saint Kitts fell short of the two-thirds majority needed. Nevis continues in its efforts to separate from Saint Kitts.

That was it. I promised one minute.

For other condensed info check also my other posts on local culture (don’t make the mistakes I made), local food or local drinks. And when you call your friends to tell them you were by far the most knowledgeable at the party, do that with confidence that you’ll not get hit with a 6.99 per minute bill. You’ll also pick the local food from the tray, and order a local drink with confidence.

  1. Cultural Mistakes To Avoid in  Saint Kitts and Nevis
  2. Does my current phone work in  Saint Kitts and Nevis ? Tips to cell phone usage in  Saint Kitts and Nevis
  3. Local food you should try in  Saint Kitts and Nevis and No miss drinks in  Saint Kitts and Nevis

Now, cheers to the most Saint Kitts and Nevis aware person at the cocktail party.

What are the key history moments for Saint Kitts and Nevis?

The one minute summary for Saint Kitts and Nevis geography

Best places to see in Saint Kitts and Nevis

Of course, with an area no larger than 261 km2, Saint Kitts and Nevis has a somewhat limited (but not absent!) array of typical sights. It’s hardly a set back for visitors to these two small islands though, as they have all the enchanting natural beauty of the Caribbean. It’s strategic location made Saint Kitts a colonial hotspot and a focus point of European nations in their struggle for power over the West Indies islands.

Saint Kitts and Nevis photo

Photo by Commodon

The colonial settlers rapidly expanded sugar plantations and imported African slaves, thus laying the foundations for the islands’ colourful culture. Festivities, crafts and other displays of that culture is one of the islands’ main tourist attractions now, as are the ruins of the many plantations. The Scenic Railway, travelling on the tracks of the old sugar train railway, is a great way to see the best of them. However, nothing makes the islands history as tangible as the impressive and well preserved remains of the Brimstone Hill Fortress.

It’s both a national park and a UNESCO World Heritage Site and provides some stunning views over the surrounding area and even some nearby islands. Only a few ruins and some canons remain of Fort Charles on Nevis, the fortifications of Charlestown. Basseterre is a pleasant place and has a view sights, including St. George’s Anglican Church and Indepence Square, once the site of the slave market. The impressive 1894 Old Treasury building, originally the gateway to Basseterre, is an important historic sight but also houses the National Museum with expositions on the history, identity and independence of the island.

The islands’ countryside is lovely, with panoramic views of green hills covered in rain forest as well as beaches and of course the bright blue sea. The main road circling the island will take you to most points of interests, some great beaches and several villages. The hike up Mount Liamuiga, a dormant volcano on St. Kitts and the highest peak of the islands, is particularly popular and worthwhile for the great views from the top. Diving Diving sites are ample and gorgeous, serving both beginning and experienced divers. Of course there’s a broad and colourful range of reefs and sea life to see, but also ship wrecks and caves.

For beginners, the Monkey Shoals and Friars Bay Reef are good and easily reachable sites. Sandy Point is a National Marine Park for its beautiful coral heads and magnificent sea life. The Wreck of River Taw, M.V. Talata Wreck and the more recently sunk Wreck of the Corinthian are popular sites. Turtle Bar is of course famous for the many turtles that roam the site, but you’ll also commonly spot them at Frigate Bay Reef. For more experienced divers, the strong currents at Nags Head are a nice challenge, and the broad range of fish at Aquarium is a good spot.