The one minute summary on Saint Lucia

This is it: one minute to the best info on Saint Lucia. This info alone will put you ahead of 99% of foreigners visiting Saint Lucia, garner the admiration of the locals who will instantly want to be your friends, and the envy of your fellow travelers. Read on. You’ll make friends faster that way, become a traveler instead of simply being a tourist, and also enjoy your travels a lot more.

Saint Lucia  photo

Photo by derekskey

The island, with its fine natural harbor at Castries, was contested between England and France throughout the 17th and early 18th centuries (changing possession 14 times); it was finally ceded to the UK in 1814. Even after the abolition of slavery on its plantations in 1834, Saint Lucia remained an agricultural island, dedicated to producing tropical commodity crops. Self-government was granted in 1967 and independence in 1979.

That was it. I promised one minute.

For other condensed info check also my other posts on local culture (don’t make the mistakes I made), local food or local drinks. And when you call your friends to tell them you were by far the most knowledgeable at the party, do that with confidence that you’ll not get hit with a 6.99 per minute bill. You’ll also pick the local food from the tray, and order a local drink with confidence.

  1. Cultural Mistakes To Avoid in  Saint Lucia
  2. Does my current phone work in  Saint Lucia ? Tips to cell phone usage in  Saint Lucia
  3. Local food you should try in  Saint Lucia and No miss drinks in  Saint Lucia

Now, cheers to the most Saint Lucia aware person at the cocktail party.

What are the key history moments for Saint Lucia?

Saint Lucia’s first known inhabitants were Arawaks, believed to have come from northern South America around 200-400CE. Numerous archaeological sites on the island have produced specimens of the Arawak’s’ well-developed pottery. Caribs gradually replaced Arawaks during the period from 800 to 1000CE. Europeans first landed on the island in either 1492 or 1502 during Spain’s early exploration of the Caribbean. The British failed in their first attempts at colonization in the early 17th century.

The island was first settled by the French, who signed a treaty with the local Caribs in 1660. Like the British and Dutch, the French began to develop the island for the cultivation of sugar cane on extensive plantations. Caribbean conditions were hard, and many slaves died before they lived long enough to have children. The French (and later British) continued to import slaves until the latter nation abolished the trade, and then the legal institution. By that time, people of ethnic African descent greatly outnumbered those of ethnic European background.

Thereafter Saint Lucia was much contested by the two European powers until the British secured it in 1814. It was part of the British Windward Islands colony. It joined the West Indies Federation (1958–62) when the colony was dissolved. In 1967, Saint Lucia became one of the six members of the West Indies Associated States, with internal self-government. In 1979 it gained full independence.

The one minute summary for Saint Lucia geography

Best places to see in Saint Lucia

Pigeon Island nature reserve – just north of Gros Islet, the park has some of the oldest buildings on St.Lucia and affords views across to Martinique