The one minute summary on

This is it: one minute to the best info on Slovenia. This info alone will put you ahead of 99% of foreigners visiting Slovenia, garner the admiration of the locals who will instantly want to be your friends, and the envy of your fellow travelers. Read on. You’ll make friends faster that way, become a traveler instead of simply being a tourist, and also enjoy your travels a lot more.

 

The Slovene lands were part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire until the latter’s dissolution at the end of World War I. In 1918, the Slovenes joined the Serbs and Croats in forming a new multinational state, which was named Yugoslavia in 1929. After World War II, Slovenia became a republic of the renewed Yugoslavia, which though communist, distanced itself from Moscow’s rule.

Dissatisfied with the exercise of power by the majority Serbs, the Slovenes succeeded in establishing their independence in 1991 after a short 10-day war. Historical ties to Western Europe, a strong economy, and a stable democracy have assisted in Slovenia’s transformation to a modern state. Slovenia acceded to both NATO and the EU in the spring of 2004; it joined the eurozone in 2007.

That was it. I promised one minute.

For other condensed info check also my other posts on local culture (don’t make the mistakes I made), local food or local drinks. And when you call your friends to tell them you were by far the most knowledgeable at the party, do that with confidence that you’ll not get hit with a 6.99 per minute bill. You’ll also pick the local food from the tray, and order a local drink with confidence.

  1. Cultural Mistakes To Avoid in  Slovenia
  2. Does my current phone work in  Slovenia ? Tips to cell phone usage in  Slovenia
  3. Local food you should try in  Slovenia and No miss drinks in  Slovenia

Now, cheers to the most Slovenia aware person at the cocktail party.

What are the key history moments for Slovenia?

Slovenes settled the region in the 6th century, when they were incorporated together with Bavarians and Franks. At that time, Christianisation took place. Afterwards, the Slovene lands were part of the Holy Roman Empire, and later they were part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire until the dissolution at the end of World War I in 1918 – when the Kingdom of Serbs, Croats and Slovenes was formed, and turned into a multinational state named Yugoslavia in 1929.

After Slovenia was occupied by the Axis powers and later liberated by the Partisans with the help of Western Allies in World War II, Slovenia became a republic in the renewed Yugoslavia, which although communist, distanced itself from Moscow’s rule. Dissatisfied with the exercise of power by the majority Serbs, Slovenes succeeded in establishing their independence in 1991 after a short 10-day war. Slovenia acceded to both NATO and the EU in 2004, and joined the eurozone and the Schengen Area in 2007, completing the final steps of accession to the European Union.

The one minute summary for Slovenia geography

Best places to see in Slovenia

The National Museum of Slovenia in Ljubljana (Presernova 20, entrance from Muzejska Street), is the oldest and largest Slovene museum. It was founded in 1821. The museum building on the Museum Street was built in 1888. It was the first building assigned solely to Slovene culture. Today, the museum stores a rich collection of valuable objects.

The oldest ones date back to the Stone Age, while there are also newer ones that are still used in today’s modern times. The new building of the National Museum of Slovenia on the (Metelkova, Maistrova Street 1), exhibits collections of the applied art heritage of Slovenia. The permanent exhibition brings together objects of applied arts from the 14th century to the present day.

In Savinja and Šalek Valley there are many Slovenian natural and cultural pearls: Logar Valley Landscape Park with splendid Rinka Waterfall (90 m), Sol?ava Panoramic Road with great vistas on Kamnik-Savinja Alps, Cathedral of St Mohor and Fortunat in Gornji Grad (the most voluminous Slovenian chatedral), Snežna jama Cave, the highest tourist cave in Slovenia, Coal Mining Museum with three Velenje lakes.