It’s said that the biggest fear one has it that of public peaking. For me, my biggest fear is not having cellular service, and not being able to connect while on the go.

So, how does one connect while in Spain

Some quick tips to staying connected while on the go:
The main mobile network operators in Spain are Yoigo, Vodafone, Movistar and Orange, as in most of Europe voice and data coverage is generally good in urban areas however it can be patchy in rural locations, OpenSignal provide a Spain cell coverage map allowing comparison between all the networks.

When using a laptop in an outdoor location, always be aware of your surroundings and the location of your belongings. Also be aware that even though it is not yet illegal to use unsecured wi-fi signals, there is work being done on the relevant laws and it may become illegal very soon.

laptop photo

Photo by Andy Polaine

“Locutorios” (Call Shops) are widely spread in bigger cities and touristy locations. In Madrid or Toledo it’s very easy to find one. Making calls from “Locutorios” tend to be much cheaper, especially international calls (usually made through VoIP). They are usually a good pick for calling home.

Cheap mobile phones (less than €50) with some pre-paid minutes are sold at FNAC (Plaza Callao if you’re staying in Madrid, or El Triangle if you’re staying in Barcelona) or any phone operator’s shop (Vodafone, Movistar, Orange) and can be purchased without many formalities (ID is usually required). Topping-up is then done by buying scratch cards from the small stores “Frutos Secos,” supermarkets, vending points (often found in tobacco shops) or kiosks — recharging via the internet or via an ATM does not work with foreign cr cards.

To call home cheap you may opt to buy prepaid calling cards which are widely available in newspapers or grocery stores around the city. Simply ask for a “tarjeta telefonica”. When travelling in Spain is not easy getting connected, Internet pre-paid cards can be purchased but with few formalities.

Wi-Fi points in bars and cafeterias are available after ordering, and most Hotels offer Wi-Fi connection in common areas for their guests. Prepaid portable WiFi Hot spot service is now available in Spain (provided by tripNETer and AlldayInternet ) which allows the connection to any WiFi device: Smart-phones, Tablets, PCs… Other tips on staying connected while in Spain? Please add your comments and tips.

It’s said that the biggest fear one has it that of public peaking. For me, my biggest fear is not having cellular service, and not being able to connect while on the go.
So, how does one connect while in Spain

Some quick tips to staying connected while on the go:

The main mobile network operators in Spain are Yoigo, Vodafone, Movistar and Orange, as in most of Europe voice and data coverage is generally good in urban areas however it can be patchy in rural locations, OpenSignal provide a Spain cell coverage map allowing comparison between all the networks.
When using a laptop in an outdoor location, always be aware of your surroundings and the location of your belongings. Also be aware that even though it is not yet illegal to use unsecured wi-fi signals, there is work being done on the relevant laws and it may become illegal very soon. “Locutorios” (Call Shops) are widely spread in bigger cities and touristy locations. In Madrid or Toledo it’s very easy to find one. Making calls from “Locutorios” tend to be much cheaper, especially international calls (usually made through VoIP). They are usually a good pick for calling home.

Cheap mobile phones (less than €50) with some pre-paid minutes are sold at FNAC (Plaza Callao if you’re staying in Madrid, or El Triangle if you’re staying in Barcelona) or any phone operator’s shop (Vodafone, Movistar, Orange) and can be purchased without many formalities (ID is usually required). Topping-up is then done by buying scratch cards from the small stores “Frutos Secos,” supermarkets, vending points (often found in tobacco shops) or kiosks — recharging via the internet or via an ATM does not work with foreign credit cards.To call home cheap you may opt to buy prepaid calling cards which are widely available in newspapers or grocery stores around the city. Simply ask for a “tarjeta telefonica”. When travelling in Spain is not easy getting connected, Internet pre-paid cards can be purchased but with few formalities.
Wi-Fi points in bars and cafeterias are available after ordering, and most Hotels offer Wi-Fi connection in common areas for their guests. Prepaid portable WiFi Hot spot service is now available in Spain (provided by tripNETer and AlldayInternet ) which allows the connection to any WiFi device: Smart-phones, Tablets, PCs…

Other tips on staying connected while in Spain? Please add your comments and tips.