The one minute summary on Trinidad and Tobago

This is it: one minute to the best info on Trinidad and Tobago. This info alone will put you ahead of 99% of foreigners visiting Trinidad and Tobago, garner the admiration of the locals who will instantly want to be your friends, and the envy of your fellow travelers. Read on. You’ll make friends faster that way, become a traveler instead of simply being a tourist, and also enjoy your travels a lot more.

Trinidad and Tobago photo

Photo by D-Stanley

First colonized by the Spanish, the islands came under British control in the early 19th century. The islands’ sugar industry was hurt by the emancipation of the slaves in 1834. Manpower was replaced with the importation of contract laborers from India between 1845 and 1917, which boosted sugar production as well as the cocoa industry. The discovery of oil on Trinidad in 1910 added another important export.

Independence was attained in 1962. The country is one of the most prosperous in the Caribbean thanks largely to petroleum and natural gas production and processing. Tourism, mostly in Tobago, is targeted for expansion and is growing. The government is coping with a rise in violent crime.

That was it. I promised one minute.

For other condensed info check also my other posts on local culture (don’t make the mistakes I made), local food or local drinks. And when you call your friends to tell them you were by far the most knowledgeable at the party, do that with confidence that you’ll not get hit with a 6.99 per minute bill. You’ll also pick the local food from the tray, and order a local drink with confidence.

  1. Cultural Mistakes To Avoid in  Trinidad and Tobago
  2. Does my current phone work in  Trinidad and Tobago ? Tips to cell phone usage in  Trinidad and Tobago
  3. Local food you should try in  Trinidad and Tobago and No miss drinks in  Trinidad and Tobago

Now, cheers to the most Trinidad and Tobago aware person at the cocktail party.

What are the key history moments for Trinidad and Tobago?

Independence 20 March 1956 National holiday Independence Day, 20 March – a time when hotel rooms are completely booked. Plan accordingly. Tunisia has a rich cultural history, ever since Antiquity. The Carthaginian Empire, Rome’s arch enemy, was centered in Tunisia. Its capital, Carthage, is now a suburb of Tunis. Founded by Phoenician settlers from Tyre and Sidon (modern day Lebanon), Carthage was an ancient Merranean powerhouse.

Trinidad and Tobago photo

Photo by neiljs

Three wars between Rome and Carthage (known as the Punic wars) were waged in the first few centuries before the birth of Christ. These culminated with the decimation of Carthage in 146 B.C. by the Roman general Scipio, who is said to have wept at its destruction. Between the destruction of Ancient Carthage and the Arabic conquests of the 7th century, many cultures have made Tunisia their home. Carthage enjoyed a new period of prosperity under the Roman Empire until its collapse in the 5th century. Roman rule was replaced briefly by the Vandals, who made Carthage the capital of their kingdom. Carthage was then absorbed temporarily by the Byzantine Empire, until the rise of Islam in the 7th century. After the dissipation of the Arabic Caliphates, the Ottoman Empire’s Turkish Pashas ruled Tunisia.

With the fall of the Ottoman Empire, Tunisia eventually fell under the sway of European Imperialism, as a French Protectorate, along with neighboring Algeria. Following independence from France in 1956, President Habib Bourguiba established a strict one-party state. He dominated the country for 31 years, repressing Islamic fundamentalism and establishing rights for women unmatched by any other Arab nation. Bourghiba was quietly replaced in 1987 by Zine El Abidine Ben Ali (Ben Ali, for short). His forced abdication was carried out under the pretext that he was unfit to carry out his duties as president, due to his ailing mental and physical state as a result of extreme old age. Nonetheless Bourghiba is still cred with the birth of the modern state of Tunisia, for which he fought his entire life. In recent years,

Tunisia has taken a moderate, non-aligned stance in its foreign relations. Domestically, it has sought to defuse rising pressure for a more open political society. In Jan 2011, President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali left the country along with his wife, after he saw widespread protests in the country also known as the Jasmine Revolution, the first event in the so-called Arab Spring. The new government was elected in Tunisia on December 2011. Protests remains ongoing in the country and Tunis still has military control points and razor wire in service, although this appears to be largely symbolic.

The one minute summary for Trinidad and Tobago geography

Best places to see in Trinidad and Tobago

History and archaeology Although Tunisia is best known today for its beach resort holidays, the country has an amazing heritage with some exceptional archaelogical remains to be explored. Little remains of Carthage, but what does is well presented and an absolute must see for every visitor to Tunisia. This great city of the Pheonician and Punic periods dates from the 6th century BC and was the base of a hugely powerful empire spanning the entire south Merranean.

Its most famous general was Hannibal who crossed the Alps to battle the Romans. Hannibal suffered his first significant defeat at the Battle of Zama in 202 BC, and after over 50 years of being watched closely by Rome, Carthage was attacked in the 3rd Punic War and completely destroyed. The city was redeveloped by the Romans a century later, and Carthage became the capital of the Roman province of Africa. What we see today are the remains of that era. Both Monastir and Sousse are well known as beach resorts amongst sun-worshiping Europeans, but they are also towns with great historical heritage. Monastir has a history back to the time of Hannibal, an especially notable museum and a wonderful ribat (fortified monastery).

Sousse is a UNESCO World Heritage Site for its authentic medina and souk, which should not be missed. El Kef has a splendid Byzantine kasbah rising out of the old medina with both Byzantine and Ottoman architecture evident. At El Jem you will find exceptional remains of a Roman ampitheater, yet another Tunisian UNESCO World Heritage Site. North of the desert In the northwest, Jugurtha’s Table is a large mesa with a moon-like surface and deep crevasses and is normally accessed from the town of El Kef. The desert Tunisia has some of the most accessible, beautiful Saharan desert scenery. George Lucas fans will recognise the village of Matmata. The troglodyte dwellings here were used as the set for the young Luke Skywalker’s home of Tatooine. The central western desert towns of Tozeur (with the film set of Mos Eisley) and Douz are surrounded by beautiful Saharan dune scenery. Since 2009 the oasis Ksar Ghilane is accessable by tarmac road.