The one minute summary on Tuvalu

This is it: one minute to the best info on Tuvalu. This info alone will put you ahead of 99% of foreigners visiting Tuvalu, garner the admiration of the locals who will instantly want to be your friends, and the envy of your fellow travelers. Read on. You’ll make friends faster that way, become a traveler instead of simply being a tourist, and also enjoy your travels a lot more.

Tuvalu photo

Photo by mrlins

In 1974, ethnic differences within the British colony of the Gilbert and Ellice Islands caused the Polynesians of the Ellice Islands to vote for separation from the Micronesians of the Gilbert Islands. The following year, the Ellice Islands became the separate British colony of Tuvalu. Independence was granted in 1978. In 2000, Tuvalu negotiated a contract leasing its Internet domain name “.tv” for $50 million in royalties over a 12-year period.

That was it. I promised one minute.

For other condensed info check also my other posts on local culture (don’t make the mistakes I made), local food or local drinks. And when you call your friends to tell them you were by far the most knowledgeable at the party, do that with confidence that you’ll not get hit with a 6.99 per minute bill. You’ll also pick the local food from the tray, and order a local drink with confidence.

  1. Cultural Mistakes To Avoid in  Tuvalu
  2. Does my current phone work in  Tuvalu ? Tips to cell phone usage in  Tuvalu
  3. Local food you should try in  Tuvalu and No miss drinks in  Tuvalu

Now, cheers to the most Tuvalu aware person at the cocktail party.

What are the key history moments for Tuvalu?

The one minute summary for Tuvalu geography

Best places to see in Tuvalu

Tuvalu is not a destination for those in search of spectacular sightseeing opportunities. The island nation is not only small, it also lacks any city-like destination or architectural heritage. There are no hills or mountain ranges, no rivers or gorges. And yet, it is a delightful pacific destination, where your time is well spent in the shade of a palm trees on one of the pretty beaches. Traditional local culture remains very much alive, making the people of Tuvalu one of the nation’s best assets.

Traditional dancing is performed on special occasions, and the local “maneapa” (the town hall) is your best chances of experiencing one. The Funafuti Conservation Area on the western side of the Funafuti atoll has some of the best natural sights, and includes reefs, the gorgeous lagoon, channel, parts of the ocean and islands habitats. Its diversity in marine life makes it an excellent place for scuba diving or snorkelling.

The massive stationing of US troops in the Second World War left the island nation with a number of war time remains, including airstrips, bunkers and plane wrecks along the main island of Fongafale and near the village of Nanumea. The tiny island of Motulalo in Nukufetau has an airstrip too, as well as some plane wrecks. If you have any interest in postal stamps, the Philatelic Bureau on Funafuti is a must-see. The Tuvalu Women’s Handicraft Centre at the airport is a good place to see and buy local crafts.

If you have time however, try catching a boat to one of the outer islands and admire the local people’s skills in making ornaments, fans, mats, baskets or woodcarvings there.