The one minute summary on Uruguay

This is it: one minute to the best info on Uruguay. This info alone will put you ahead of 99% of foreigners visiting Uruguay, garner the admiration of the locals who will instantly want to be your friends, and the envy of your fellow travelers. Read on. You’ll make friends faster that way, become a traveler instead of simply being a tourist, and also enjoy your travels a lot more.

Montevideo, founded by the Spanish in 1726 as a military stronghold, soon took advantage of its natural harbor to become an important commercial center. Claimed by Argentina but annexed by Brazil in 1821, Uruguay declared its independence four years later and secured its freedom in 1828 after a three-year struggle. The administrations of President Jose BATLLE in the early 20th century launched widespread political, social, and economic reforms that established a statist tradition.

A violent Marxist urban guerrilla movement named the Tupamaros, launched in the late 1960s, led Uruguay’s president to cede control of the government to the military in 1973. By yearend, the rebels had been crushed, but the military continued to expand its hold over the government. Civilian rule was not restored until 1985. In 2004, the left-of-center Frente Amplio Coalition won national elections that effectively ended 170 years of political control previously held by the Colorado and Blanco parties. Uruguay’s political and labor conditions are among the freest on the continent.

That was it. I promised one minute.

For other condensed info check also my other posts on local culture (don’t make the mistakes I made), local food or local drinks. And when you call your friends to tell them you were by far the most knowledgeable at the party, do that with confidence that you’ll not get hit with a 6.99 per minute bill. You’ll also pick the local food from the tray, and order a local drink with confidence.

  1. Cultural Mistakes To Avoid in  Uruguay
  2. Does my current phone work in  Uruguay ? Tips to cell phone usage in  Uruguay
  3. Local food you should try in  Uruguay and No miss drinks in  Uruguay

Now, cheers to the most Uruguay aware person at the cocktail party.

What are the key history moments for Uruguay?

Uruguay was discovered by Spanish Adelantados in the ends of the XVI century, and was part of the United Provinces of the De la Plata river until 1811. (Although plata literally means “silver” in Spanish, “plate” is the traditional and correct translation as it was used as a synonym for precious metals up until the 19th century.) Originally, Uruguay was simply known as the Banda Oriental, or Eastern Band, of colonies along the eastern edge of the Uruguay and De la Plata river. When Buenos Aires expelled the last Viceroy, Baltasar Cisneros, the capitalof the Viceroyalty moved to Montevideo.

Uruguay Smart photo

Photo by rapidtravelchai

The rebel navy sailed from Buenos Aires in an attempt to overcome the Spanish troops in that city, aided by the local rebel troops. When finally Montevideo was freed from Spain, Uruguay intended to secede from Buenos Aires, only to be invaded by the Brazilian Empire, which started the Argentine-Brazilian war in 1813. After a variety of confusing twists, the war ultimately ended in a stalemate. With the assistance of mediation by the British government, both warring countries agreed to end their territorial claims on the Banda Oriental in 1828, thus giving birth to the new Eastern Republic of Uruguay. A constitution was subsequently drafted and adopted in 1830.

British assistance in the creation of Uruguay led to a long history of British influence (including the habit of driving on the left), which ended only with World War II. The Argentinian Civil War which ravaged that country during the 19th century was not a stranger to Uruguay, which soon gave birth to two opposing parties, the Whites (liberals) and the Reds (traditionalists) that eventually also led to a Uruguayan Civil War that went on in various hot and cold phases until the beginnings of the twentieth century. The story goes that the parties’ colors originally came from armbands allegedly torn from the Uruguayan flag, but the conservatives switched to red armbands when they realized that red faded less quickly in the sun than blue.

In the early 20th century, President José Batlle y Ordóñez oversaw Uruguay’s modernization and industrialization, and was also able to squash the remnants of caudillismo political culture from the Spanish colonial era which to the present continue to cause trouble in countries like Argentina. This is why Uruguay since Batlle’s presidency has enjoyed much lower levels of corruption than the rest of South America. However, the simmering tension between the left and right wings of Uruguayan politics persisted. From 1954 to 1967, Uruguay tried an unusual solution borrowed from Switzerland: a collegiate Executive Office in which a different member was designated President every year.

In this way, Uruguay became the “Latin American Switzerland” for a while, acting as model of democracy and banking liberties until a military coup ended all this. A Marxist urban guerrilla movement, the Tupamaros, launched in the late 1960s, led Uruguay’s president Juan María Bordaberry to “agree” to military control of his administration in 1973. (They returned the favor by firing him from his job in 1976 and appointing the first of several puppet presidents.) By the end of 1974 the rebels had been brutally crushed (and Tupamaro leader and future president Jose Mujica was imprisoned at the bottom of a well), but the military continued to expand its hold over the government, by engaging in widespread torture and disappearances of alleged insurgents and anyone unfortunate enough to be perceived as opponents of the regime.

Civilian and democratic rule was not restored until 1985. Today, Uruguay’s political and labor conditions are among the most free on the continent. In 2004, a leftist coalition (the Frente Amplio or Broad Front) which included the Tupamaros won elections which left them in control of both houses of congress, the presidency, and most city and regional governments. In 2009, former guerrilla leader Mujica was elected president, although he continued to lead a modest lifestyle of growing flowers on his farm outside Montevideo, driving an old Volkswagen Beetle, and donating 90% of his salary to charity.

The one minute summary for Uruguay geography

Best places to see in Uruguay

Confitería Irisarri, Minas. Los Dedos (the fingers), Punta del Este. Castillo de Piria, Piriapolis. Abbotsford, Piriapolis. Colonia del Sacramento, Colonia, Colonia. World heritage site Plaza Independencia, Palacio Salv and Old City, Montevideo. Montevideo Centenario Stadium and Football Museum, Montevideo. Palacio Legislativo, Montevideo. The Uruguayan Parliament Rambla (Promenade) of Montevideo, Montevideo. jose ignacio, maldonado, costa alantica.